The Chinese Agricultural Technical Mission introduced four varieties of cantaloupe successfully on the Agricultural station at Portsmouth. These four varieties have been successfully cultivated and harvested. The Chinese Agricultural Technical Mission recently carried out a model demonstration for local farmers. As can be seen in the following photos the cultivation technique used are impressive and innovative. The cantaloupe varieties were grown under a protected structure using a trellis system for the plant to grow and develop. Fertilizers and irrigation was also used to ensure that the plants gave their maximum potential. Cantaloupe vines require abundant moisture while making their most vigorous growth, and until the early set melons are fully sized. Do not irrigate or irrigate lightly just before and during the ripening period or sugar content will be reduced and stem-end cracking and fruit rotting may occur.

Canteloupes refers to a variety of the Cucumis melo species in the Cucurbitaceae family, it range in weight from 0.5 to 5 kilograms. They are typically melons with a hard scaly or warty rind, usually grown in Europe, Asia, and United States.

In 2013, China accounted for 49% of the total (14.4 million tonnes) world production. They are descended from tropical plants and tend to require warm temperatures throughout a relatively long growing period. Cantaloupes grow best on well drained, warm, sandy or silt loam soils, but a variety of soil types can be used. To reduc the risk of diseases, do not plant on land where cantaloupe, watermelon, squash, cucumber, or pumpkin have been grown during the past three years.

Cantaloupe is normally eaten as a fresh fruit, as a salad, or as a dessert with ice cream or custard. Because the surface of a cantaloupe can contain harmful bacteria—in particular, Salmonella—it is recommended to wash and scrub the melon thoroughly before cutting and consumption. The fruit should be refrigerated after cutting it and consumed in less than three days to prevent risk of Salmonella or other bacterial pathogen.

Raw cantaloupe is 90% water, 8% carbohydrates, 0.8% protein and 0.3% fat. Fresh cantaloupe is a rich source of vitamin C and vitamin A , with other nutrients in negligible amounts.

The Chinese Agricultural Technical Mission Introduced Cantaloupe Successfully on the Portsmouth Agricultural Station
The Chinese Agricultural Technical Mission Introduced Cantaloupe Successfully on the Portsmouth Agricultural Station
The Chinese Agricultural Technical Mission Introduced Cantaloupe Successfully on the Portsmouth Agricultural Station
The Chinese Agricultural Technical Mission Introduced Cantaloupe Successfully on the Portsmouth Agricultural Station
The Chinese Agricultural Technical Mission Introduced Cantaloupe Successfully on the Portsmouth Agricultural Station